Betrayal Trauma

Many people suffer unnecessarily from the effects of trauma and abuse. Often, people suffer because they don’t realize they have experienced trauma, or they underestimate it’s impact on their lives.

But the effects on those who have experienced trauma are very real, even when they don’t recognize it has occurred. In order to heal, trauma must first be understood and recognized. Then it must be processed with the help of someone with appropriate training and skills.

Trauma may be defined as life experiences that leave lasting negative impacts on a person’s thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and relationships. These experiences may include accidental events like a flood or fire, the loss of a loved one, betrayal in a significant relationship, and many different forms of abuse.

Traumatic experiences affect each person in unique ways and it is not helpful to compare different peoples’ responses to the trauma they go through. Rather, we should try to understand the circumstances of a person’s trauma and their individual response to what happened.

As therapists, we begin by assessing the nature and extent of an individual’s trauma. We consider three factors: what, when, and how often.

How We Can Help

The foundation of our therapeutic approach to healing trauma is the establishment of a safe environment in the therapy room and a strong and compassionate bond between therapist and client. This safety and connection gives survivors the courage they need to face the wounds of their past.

In the context of that safe and trusting relationship, we use an advanced therapeutic technique called “Brainspotting,” which accesses the unconscious mind and nervous system. Neurologically, trauma is recorded in multiple structures within the brain, including conscious parts where memories and beliefs are stored and unconscious parts where emotions and bodily senses are held.

Each trauma we experience creates a network of links among these different parts of the brain. In order to heal trauma, all of these links must be accessed together and processed in a way that removes the traumatic memories from even the most unconscious places in our minds and bodies.

The most common forms of therapy, which are talk therapy and behavior modification techniques, tend to have little or no lasting therapeutic effect on trauma because they access only the most conscious part of the brain. In contrast, “EMDR” and “Brainspotting” access deep levels of traumatic memory, bringing lasting relief.   While Brainspotting and EMDR are extremely powerful forms of psychotherapy, they are also very gentle, and they allow the person…….needs.

While Brainspotting is an extremely powerful and effective form of psychotherapy, it is also extremely gentle. It marshals deep levels of internal resources, which greatly strengthen the survivor to face therapeutic challenges. And it allows the person to proceed at a pace that is just right for his or her needs.

Research consistently shows that for betrayal trauma, optimal change results from a combination of both individual and group treatment.

Call or text about our individual or group therapy to see how we can help you 801.272.3420